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In The News
Opportunity to review Greenwood PP preliminary management statement
Friday, 03 October 2008 00:00
A preliminary management statement for WJB Greenwood Provincial Park has been prepared. It is available for inspection until November 14. You can get a copy at http://www.ontarioparks.com/english/wjbg_planning.html. For more information, to submit comments, or to be added to the project mailing list, contact Kevin Pinkerton, Park Superintendent, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .
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Contact info, finally!
Tuesday, 23 September 2008 00:00

Several people have pointed out recently that we do not have contact info on our webpage. This oversight took longer than necessary to fix due to my technological incompetence. However, there is now a link on our right-hand sidebar called “About FOT & Contact Info.” There you will find all you need to know. Like this:

To mail the FOT:

PO Box 398
Temagami, Ontario
P0H 2H0
Canada

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Ontario’s Mining Act Review
Tuesday, 16 September 2008 00:00
Ontario’s Ministry of Northern Development and Mines is undergoing a review of the province’s Mining Act. The Friends of Temagami has been active in this process, attending an information session, and preparing a submission on the review.

The FOT’s submission focused on the following:

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Old-growth forests are carbon sinks, not sources
Monday, 15 September 2008 00:00
A new study in the September 11 edition of the journal Nature smashes the myth that young forests absorb more carbon than old-growth. It finds that old-growth forests are net carbon sinks and that cutting them releases up to 40% of their stored carbon.

Here’s the first paragraph from the Nature study, entitled Old-growth forests as global carbon sinks (emphasis ours):

Old-growth forests remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere at rates that vary with climate and nitrogen deposition. The sequestered carbon dioxide is stored in live woody tissues and slowly decomposing organic matter in litter and soil. Old-growth forests therefore serve as a global carbon dioxide sink, but they are not protected by international treaties, because it is generally thought that ageing forests cease to accumulate carbon. Here we report a search of literature and databases for forest carbon-flux estimates. We find that in forests between 15 and 800 years of age, net ecosystem productivity (the net carbon balance of the forest including soils) is usually positive. Our results demonstrate that old-growth forests can continue to accumulate carbon, contrary to the long-standing view that they are carbon neutral.

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Old-growth forests worth more standing than cut
Friday, 05 September 2008 00:00
This from the David Suzuki Foundation, Ecojustice and the Western Canada Wilderness Committee:

Less logging of BC’s old-growth forests makes more economic sense: Study highlights dividends for climate, recreation, endangered species

We have no doubt that a similar study in Temagami would show similar results.

 
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